Microsoft Teams – getting organized and avoid posts overload.

Getting organized in Microsoft Teams is important as it basically is in all your work but specially handy when communicating with people in different time zones or working in large teams.

Your unread activity list can build up quickly overnight or when you are offline for a while.

So what can we do about it?

The organization here is a Team effort I believe and starts with actually using some basic features and taking some responsibility when creating a new post/reply.

1. Use the title field and give the main answer/statement/summary as title like “I have chocolate cookies at my desk for free to take” in stead of “Anybody hungry?”. This way it is easier for anyone to decide the post is applicable or not.

2018-02-22 09_54_00-z. TEST CHANNEL (TEAM IT Global) _ Microsoft Teams.png Title use

2. Use the Important button and only when it is really important, but do use it when it is so others can give this preference.

2018-02-22 09_57_45-z. TEST CHANNEL (TEAM IT Global) _ Microsoft Teams Important

3. Do not @[user] when it is not really needed. Similar to do not CC people in email if they are not really involved.

4. Properly use the reply button when replying and only start a new conversation when it is a new conversation, this keeps the posts much more structurized

2018-02-22 09_59_22-z. TEST CHANNEL (TEAM IT Global) _ Microsoft Teams Reply vs New

5. Use the like button in stead of adding new replies like “thanks!”.

2018-02-22 10_10_22-Microsoft Edge LIKE

6. Use the “Stop following” options for channels that are not interesting to you. This works also for auto posts created by apps.

2018-02-22 10_01_55-z. TEST CHANNEL (TEAM IT Global) _ Microsoft Teams stop following

7. Use the “save this message” option to easily find back your pending threats or reference texts.

2018-02-22 10_09_01-Microsoft Edge SAVE

8. Use the manual Read/Unread option to mark your posts in the activity feed for later followup.

2018-02-22 10_01_55-z. TEST CHANNEL (TEAM IT Global) _ Microsoft Teams mark unread

It is a lot about etiquette and thinking also about the people that you want to read your post.

Working quick is nice but lets make it quick for everybody!

 

Enjoy and lets get organized!

 

 

 

Testing and go with the flow

In the Collaboris Collab365 Teams Guest Group someone came with the question how to test new releases beforehand and first deploy to a test environment before activating it on a production environment.

So here it comes. Your production/live environment = your test environment. (Unless you have 2 Office365 tenants and can use 1 solely for testing)

what does this mean?

Go with the flow is what it means to be in the cloud.

So I can not test beforehand? Yes you can!

Lets see what Microsoft says about it…

“A good practice is to leave majority of users in Standard release and IT Pros and power users in Targeted release to evaluate new features and prepare teams to support business users and executives.”

Release validation rings for Office 365.

 ( from Set up the Standard or Targeted release options in Office 365)

Your Target release candidates you setup via the Office Admin Center > Settings > Organization profile > Release preferences > Actions …

  • Set Release Track to “Targeted release for selected users”
  • Set your IT pros and Power users as desired

2018-02-13 20_27_49-Targeted release for selected users

Combine this with keeping yourself up to date about what changes are coming up.

“For significant updates, Office customers are initially notified by the Office 365 public roadmap. As an update gets closer to rolling out, it is communicated through your Office 365 Message Center.” (from Set up the Standard or Targeted release options in Office 365)

When a new function or app can be shut off/disabled and I conclude its really needed due to circumstances, I prep to do so as soon as the update gets to the world wide standard release stage. (happens seldom I do so)

Mostly I just make sure to know what is needed for the available setting options and I am able to explain the new functionality to the users/organization.
What makes life easier is..

Get the organization to understand the continuous update logic of cloud applications and let them embrace it for it provides constantly new features and options to improve the daily work.

Site Collections

For the Classic SharePoint environment you can opt for the creation of dedicated Site Collections for testing, as playground and special development.
Note: You will need to consider here how you are going to move all your development work to your live collections ones your are happy with the result. For me I learned I better directly build my ideas on the place to be and regulate the audience from testing to go live simply via the permission settings.
Stay tuned for the next update 😉

Office365 Apps Adoption

Answering to the question I recently came upon asking for a “Teams Adoption presentation” the following came to my mind…
In my experience it is essential that there is some kind of “Real life use case Demo” included next to any presentation and best including the audience in this.

The DIY factor is very important.

Presentations on programs are boring till people can start clicking and trying themselves.
The same way as I decide to keep using an app on my mobile phone after I tried and tested it. The presentation of the app in the online store is mostly also just highlighting the basics/purpose of the app. I do not need 30 slides before trying it out.
A workshop with minimum of slides and maximum of actual role playing on a use case speaks more then a thousand words, so to say.
Find some early adopters/eager test users and include them in your use cases.
Quote from an article on adoption on the Avepoint blog puts it nicely together I think:

“Match up ideal use cases to teams that have also expressed a desire to work faster and in new ways. Capture success stories like the ones above and share them with the broader organization to drive more effective and lasting adoption. Making the journey of user adoption is as much art as it is science, so be flexible.”

Last but not least, make it a corporate event with full support from Top Management!

 

And because I am a lot into the Teams app here a 30 min. showcase video Microsoft Teams: Basics and beyond – that has a good wrap up of features you can include in your Teams Demo/Workshop.

 

Curious how your adoption is going to look like 🙂

 

Migration to Office365

Hi, I am back with a short summary post on some thoughts regarding SharePoint migration from on-premise to Office365 (the cloud).

So here are some lessons and thoughts for you to consider:

You could make use of this moment and do a cleanup and do not just migrate everything.

Start fresh where possible with the new tools provided by Office 365 like modern site pages etc.
Then migrate only the data that is really still in use.
Keep the migration mostly to the data itself, less to the setup.

Avoid to much customization where possible with Office365.

In the cloud you best go much more with the flow of the Microsoft developments because you can not always choose for changes not to be applied and at some point they are pushed by Microsoft anyway.

Start with the basics like your intranet and hub pages, metadata and get your libraries and lists up and running again.

If you have complex workflows and InfoPath forms, reconsider them. Start with: the minimum we need is the maximum we get(start implementing). And work on from there in agile/scrum like sprints building with the new blocks provided by Office365.

The challenge in switching to Office365 is also in the user training.

Getting the users and yourself understand the dynamics of working in the Cloud, with constant changes, new features and access on all your devices is at least half of the success story.

Another challenge is Cloud performance.

You have to realize that with Office365 ALL YOUR DATA GOES OVER YOUR WEB ACCESS. This can really be an issue speaking from experience. Slow loading pages or lists is not uncommon and can make users irritated.

Also avoid putting to much time in creating your own manuals

Custom manuals  get outdated before you know it. Go with the training documentation/videos provided on the web by Microsoft and the wonderful bloggers out there. Focus on a way users can easily find/go to this available and constantly updated information.

 

Hope this helps you plan your migration, enjoy and success!

 

Microsoft Teams Documentation and the Collab365 Teams Guest Users Group!

So here I am again with yet another bit of great info I thought of sharing with you.

Two items today: Microsofts own documentation page and the Collab365 Community Teams users guest group.

Microsoft’s own documentation page

Microsoft just launched a documentation page on Teams combining all the different documentation locations available regarding Microsoft Teams: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/MicrosoftTeams/Microsoft-Teams

2018-02-01 14_04_08-Microsoft Teams documentation and practical guidance _ Microsoft Docs - Internet

Collab365 Community Teams group

Under the slogan “Let’s learn Microsoft Teams together“, the Collab365 Community team launched an actual Collab365 Community Teams group.

Here you can test, learn, chat, discuss, get informed, give ideas,..etc by yourself together with all the other Teams enthousiasts out there!

Give it a try, I just love it!

2018-02-01 14_30_01-Collab365CommunityGuestTeamsPreview.png